About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
STATION
CSPAN 30
LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30
the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to the rules of the house and house resolution 821, i call up h.r. 6429, the stem jobs act of 2012, as amended, and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6429, a bill to amend the immigration and nationality act to promote innovation, investment, and research in the united states to eliminate the diversity immigrant program, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 821, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of the rules committee print 112-34, modified by the amendment printed in house report 112-697, is adopted. the bill as amended is considered as read. the gentleman from california, mr. issa, and the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, each will control 45 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. issa: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks
. and even campaigning for incoming members who were in cakewalks in north carolina and cowart -- california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail.possibly in he to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be run around a corner -- right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still count
the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance today will be led by the gentleman from california, mr. mcnerney. mr. mcnerney: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker: without objection, so ordered. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, yesterday members of the house foreign affairs committee, led by chairwoman ileana ross schneiderman, heard about the attack on our embassy in benghazi, libya. this resulted in the death of four corner american heroes. sadly -- four american heroes. the people deserve answers as to what happened on the evening of september 11, 2012. why did the administration not make an immediate response in the area of the consulate as requested during the six-h
rights. i thank the gentleman for yielding. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. mr. dreier: with that i'm very happy to yield toe my very good friend from huntington beach, my fellow californian, mr. rohrabacher, three minutes. pending that let me say he and i have been great friends since he was a speechwriter for ronald reagan. we have worked closely on a wide range of things. and i just told him, mr. speaker, since i'm leaving congress, he's taught me one thing and one thing only, and that is how to make margaritas. with that i'm happy to yield to my friend, mr. rohrabacher. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. rohrabacher: i rise in support of the rule and this legislation and note that the classified nature of that margarita formula should never be disclosed to an enemy of the united states, of course, but we will be glad to transmit that information to our colleagues on the other side of the aisle. in the spirit of bipartisanship. i do rise in support of this rule and h.r. 6156. the legislation to grant permanent normal t
, they would need to do better in this type of district. >> california is a solid blue state for the president, but a couple of interesting house races in that state. >> california, we can almost ignore the state come even though it is the largest state. there have only been one or two seats that had a chance of one party taking over the other. but the citizen legislator redistricting commission and the top two primary that has been turned on its head. democrats need to almost sweep all of the competitive races that we have in california in order to get even close to the 25. >> a couple of house races in which an incumbent is in danger, first in maryland. >> roscoe bartlett is a victim of democratic redistricting where he used to represent western maryland and now comes down to montgomery county and the washington, d.c. suburbs. he faces delaney, who is surprising. but the democratic nature -- the new democratic nature of the district will be tough for bartlett, even though ross perot has -- even though he has an element that the stomach of a typical republican. but he is facing a very differe
's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. speaker. we're back and america expects that we ought to be going back to work and we have a heavy load ahead of us. we want to make sure that every american has the opportunity to climb that economic and social ladder as high as they want you can go so we have to make sure those ladders of opportunity are in place. we also have to make sure that we are a compassionate nation, that we're willing to reach out to those in our country who have been harmed by devastating natural disasters. we certainly saw this on the east coast and i'd like to spend a good portion of this hour talking about how we as a nation can respond to superstorm sandy and the lessons that we should learn from had disaster. it's not the first that has occurred in america, and it's certainly not going to be the last. in the previous disasters we learned a few lessons but it seems as though we have achieved the necessary wisdom from those
and the california coast. but most will, i will remember the people i have met, their strength, their values, their generosity and hospitality to me and tv and our family. it is very important that we continue to fight for them and for families all across america. we have to fight for that young family in long island, new york. the one that wants to buy a home in the community they grew up in cannot afford it. we have to fight for that family in sioux city, iowa that can afford health insurance to pay the bills for its young son. we have to fight for those high school students in los angeles who are saying no to drugs and yes to their future. we have to open up that door of college opportunity to every young person in this country. [cheers and applause] we have to fight to end the shame of homelessness in this country. we have to fight for those unemployed steelworkers in pennsylvania and youngstown, ohio who want to be able to have a good job and a good wage to support themselves and their families. and we have to fight for those families and met with in california whose children today are
member on the energy and commerce committee, the gentleman from california, mr. waxman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much for yielding to me. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the bill. a warmer planet has less ice, higher sea levels, more water in the atmosphere, more powerful storms, more frequent floods, dreier droughts and worse wildfires. two weeks ago hurricane sandy brought a powerful and tragic reminder that the combination of sea level rise and more powerful storms can be deadly, devastating and extremely costly. hurricane sandy was the only -- only the latest and most dramatic in a series of extreme weather events. over the past two years we've had recordbreaking temperatures , the worst drought in 50 years , major floods, numerous tornadoes and thunderstorms and vast wildfires. this is what global warming looks like. and if we continue to ignore it it will soon look far worse. we should be doing all we can to reduce carbon pollution and slow global warming. but this bill instead tries to s
yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from california, ms. woolsey, for five minutes. ms. woolsey: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, it's the time of year when families reunite and renew their very close connections, connections that are actually in most instances the most precious parts of our lives. this thanksgiving i know all of us were grateful for the company of those we love the most. but more than 2,000 american families sat at tables where there was one less serving of the thanksgiving meal just a week ago. those families lost a loved one in the deadly war in afghanistan. now more than 11 years long and a tragically reckless policy. i'm personally grateful for the service of all of our afghanistan veterans and for their sacrifice and for the sacrifice of our military families. but sometimes i don't know how we as a congress and a nation can look them right straight in the face after everything we've put them through. the benefits of this war don't come close to justifying the devastating human cost. not just fatalities but disfiguring wou
twitter account. first, the program from the commonwealth club in california and th. >> good evening and welcome. i am your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everyone to listen to us online. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. mark feed man is c.e. ofmente and founder of encore.org. an organization working to promote encore careers, second acts for the greater good. he spear headed the experience corp one of the biggest service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize which annually provides five 100,000 dollar prices. >> freedman was described as the voice of aging baby boomers for who are sur suing meaningful and sustaining work for later in life. while the "wall street journal" stated he has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he's the author of "the big shift: navigating the new stage beyond midlife" published in april 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work with a potential to affect our individual lives and collective future. rec
. >> could you see sunday about california? we have had a big shake-up there. >> some are republican on republican and democrat on democrat, where they are spending huge sums of money. as the chairman, it is always a tough race. that is something -- it comes late and we want to make sure we do not get our clock cleaned. i would get nervous about california. >> i always pointed out to my friends that my own state does believe in a referendum or recall. we do not have term limits. >> the redistricting commission was ok. i have become much more sympathetic to a bipartisan redistricting. even if one of those gets over 50%, the top to have to run in the general election. it makes no sense to me and the california system -- >> i like the system because it forces basically candidate to talk to everybody and not just to a narrow slice of the electorate. it makes for better governance. >> it will serve as heads of your congressional campaign committees for your respective parties and you have alluded to the way things have changed since you were running these campaign committees. the influenc
it comes to nontransportation, you'll never guess. who wants to guess? california. who would have thought. >> i would have thought new york. >> exactly. because of subwaist. but this is nontransportation. -- because of subways. but this is nontransportation. 40% of our energy consumption is hvac. heating and cooling buildings, build they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons burry as governor moonbeam but he got it passed. so every building in california had energy standards and it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things -- i said portman and sheheen have been compromising. my view, katrina -- sorry -- sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or another. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry -- we have had 300 or -- sorry. phrasing it wrong. we have had in the last three or four years we have had
, i know congressman duncan hunter calling from california, he and i are writing a letter. we encouraged our colleagues to sign that letter to the administration, requiring them to comply with the intent of the law. it is unfortunate we have to do that. hopefully we will see some changes in that regard. thank you. >> thank you very much. in march, we are going to hold a jobs fair for veterans. it is interesting. there is an incredible amount of folks that come up. was meeting with franchiser this morning. they have a new initiative to help veterans get inside that business. we are excited by what that means. he mentioned 244,000 claims. do you keep track of the acceptance rate? do you submit them? how often do they make it through the system successfully? >> thank you. it takes so long for them to travel through the system. it is impossible for us to keep an accurate accounting of how many did not. i will tell you that at the board of veterans' appeals, we keep track of the claims that are returned. it breaks down how many claims every year. they did not break them down by the
the non- battleground states. we will go to california, on our line for republicans, helen, you are on. caller: good morning. i am a first-time caller. please do not cut me off. host: go ahead. caller: i will be so glad when this election is over. i was raised a republican. my whole entire life, never voted anything but republican. but i tell you what, anyone -- i switched this year, i was born to go independent, but i am going to go for barack obama. anyone that will vote for mitt romney has to be a 100% raist, or have a severe -- a 100% racist or have a severe mental problem. host: are you glad you are not subject to all of the presidential ads and mailings coming and to folks in ohio? caller: i am so glad. and i watched c-span, and the comments that i hear from the people, it is so sad. why do they hate this black president? and one thing i want to make clear. i am not voting for obama because we are black. host: we lost you there. i want to point to the columbus dispatch. the headline is -- mailings a nuisance for ohioans. those of any swing states are saying it every day, calling
the gentlelady from california, ms. woolsey, for five minutes. ms. woolsey: mr. speaker, since the house last convened in late september, about 30 more americans have given their lives in the war in afghanistan. the total number of fatalities has now passed 2,000, and as of october 7, we've been at war in afghanistan for a staggering 11 years. that's more than 2,000 families that will have an empty chair this thanksgiving, more than 2,000 families with a void that can't possibly be filled. husbands and wives who will have to go on without their life partner, children missing a parent, parents who are suffering the terrible grief of losing a child. the human cost has become too steep for our nation to bear. we can't ask for our troops and their families to endure any more sacrifice for military occupation. now more than a decade old which has not accomplished its goals and is undermining our national security as well. and of course the fiscal burden is one that rests on the shoulders of every single tax -paying american, the afghanistan price tag will be high even for a successful, well-execut
as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment crews, etc., here into new jersey and new york and connecticut as quickly as possible. and one of the things that we have been able to do, just to give you a sense of how this is an all hands deck approach, we're able to get c-17's, c-130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure in the state. for that we've got emergency generators. we've got a navy ship that has some helicopters that can help to move assets around the state as well. and so we are going to be working with governor christi's office to identify the critical infrastructure and how we can get what's needed as quickly as possible. a couple other things we are concerned about, one is as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure that people can also get to work. obviously there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york, in the city, and in other places where transportati
of mutual aid to bring in, more utility crews from surrounding areas as far south and west as california, those cruz becher drive in and get their relatively fast have driven in. but we still have crews on the west coast that have 3-5 days transit time. there is also concerned that with the fire season, if they could not get back for their fire season was that gets going, that they would not be able to send their resources. there is also aircraft. there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response. but also, understand that teams were already moving well before sandy hit. teams have been called from the midwest and south. if it makes sense that they can drive there faster than flying, then they are driving in. for those that need to, they're flying in this afternoon. >> i am wondering how the contacting process is going. some contracts are already in place. will there be proposals for other types of aid? does fema have enough money with the $3.6 billion? especially when they are only authorized for $3.8 billion. >> yes, we will
in california. when he was left to california, he was shown around by the conservative components of the party, the governor, who voted for roosevelt and he never saw johnson. he took that very personally on election day. he lost california by 3773 votes. it took two days. he was president for 10 minutes. he calls the his apartment in new york, the butler answer is, and he says, "the president- elect has gone to bed." "welcome and will you tell him when he wakes up that he's no longer president?" literally that is what happened. in those days it took a few days to get all of the returns from the west which turned out to be to his volley. been the greatest issue became preparedness. host: this history show a good track record of when these problems arise to finding ways to counteract them or at least fix them before the next elections take place? guest: policy issues? host: or procedures, what ever. guest: survival has a remarkable effect on political parties. it was unified and vehemently anti-wilson. it came up that year to be warren g. harding of ohio. the rest, as they say, is history. host
, we don't know what is going to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home in napa valley was broken into on monday. so, she actually has some little housekeeping to take care of. apparently people broken. they don't know what is missing. sort of this bizarre thing. in the event he does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the subtext -- almost a shakespearean subtext -- between steny hoyer and nancy pelosi, they have in turn together on capitol hill in the 1960's and they have been rivals for years. the last 10 or 12 years, competing for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is trying to live up somebody who she -- who would be her successor of choice. there is a lot of trauma and we just don't know where the dominoes will fall until we know her intentions. it >> just to wrap up -- who is in the next generation of would- be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement or if not
" this morning. these are still the races that are not called. arizona's second district. california's 52nd district. california's seventh district. north carolina's seventh district. called on monday was arizona ninth district. so, that is from "the washington times" this morning. the headline, "to west allen, west." he is refusing to concede the house reelection battle. six days later. that is "the washington times" with an update. front royal, virginia, republican, let me go back to you. go ahead. caller: my thought is that i am a republican, but also an american. america voted for obama. we need to pull together as a country. all of the people in the congress and the senate need to pull together and think about what all of the american people need and what is good for this country. if that means that right now republicans have to been in a little bit, they have to do it and fix this budget so that we can move forward as a country. host: taxing the wealthiest americans, is that enough? caller: now, it is not, but we have to make a move forward, working together, and if we do not stop fig
to other races in the country where they could target rick hubble -- republicans. california there have been two factors, which was to turn the congressional map on its head. we are almost able to ignore california even though it is the biggest day, and maybe watch one or two seats. now we're watching a dozen seats to see which party takes control. when it comes to the senate, if you look at the northern part of the country, if you look at montana, north dakota, indiana, and wisconsin, all four of those races are in our categories, and republicans need to win all four of them if they have any hope of getting the majority. in each one of those that they lose, the chance the republicans will gain back control decreases for the perry >> will there be anything that surprise you? our job is toj avoid as many surprises as process. in hopes of we will avoid a surprise, but i would be surprised if there is not a surprise, particularly on the house side. the presidential battleground, i think the senate battle ground, states we know come on the house side, but almost expect there to be a surpris
in california. if you look at why it won, it was a crossover of hispanics and black pastors and joined the republicans. rather than look at hispanics and blacks from the standpoint of what we white people want to look at, why not ask them what they're -- they're interested in? wynola get their values and their cultural agenda and their priorities and address that? that is where there is great common ground and i do not understand why republicans seemingly are afraid of their own shadow and. when it comes to that. >> in the first national election, president obama embraced gay marriage. [inaudible] is this a losing issue going forward for conservatives? >> this is an issue that is free much under debate. you're right. there were four blue stage yesterday that approved gay marriage. most of them by very narrow margins. there were far less margins in the state legislatures in some of those states. would-be disaster is is if the obama administration had used the judiciary to oppose a solution on all 50 states that involved making doma unconstitutional and cutting off a debate when the othe
illinois and california and are largely redistricting gains. but republican still control the house. what would you say was the democrats' message this election cycle, in terms of the issues are policy? they talked about republican extremism but, what is the strong message that the congressional level? it was two-pronged. one, medicare, and two, the ryan budget. medicare is one of the examples , and the right and budget shows different priorities, and republican parties are wrong. that message did not really .orke it was not a decisive win, certainly at the house level, for that message. my editor mentioned this to me as i was going out the door last night. we had three major house special elections over the last couple of years. one in pennsylvania, mark critz won that one, one in new york when chris lee, he of sending photographs, left office in upstate new york, was replaced by democrat, and the third when the arizona seat opened up after congresswoman giffords stepped down after that horrible shooting, she was replaced by congressman barber. the democrats won all three of those specia
to students from outside of the state from whom they receive no money from california or from china. they are private institutions. their actual costs are much less than most other private institutions. you have to understand, and i think we tried to explain that we are really only truly publicly financed for our in net-state students and that is where our priorities are. from out of state will provide you with the opportunity to attend, but we are a private institution to you folks. we will try to do our best. >> we need to think about where the u.s. didn't -- where the u.s. student -- we never had a conservative actor -- a concerted effort of a ranking system. the report does. it is almost entirely prestige and important. in its judgments as opposed to outcomes. we need to think more about how to deal with this problem. the public university has the system of accountability. but that is not everybody, of course. it's caught some way so we're trying to adjust its. but how to half in place incentives systems to focus on outputs is a big deal. during the brief period of time, i joine
's funeral in california. to some extent, we are just a big family. >> either of your reached out to the obama girls or could you speculate what it is like at their age to be first children? >> well, the answer is no, because i am not been asked. but the second thing i would say is i think there are goods and bads. one, they do not have to worry about dating. >> yet. >> yeah, but even so, they're still pretty young. susan was in her prime. >> i was. [laughter] >> i was all so -- late bloomer, but i was still in there. so, to some extent, i think some of the young men that i would need would want to go out with the secret service and have nothing to do with me. but the negative part is you would go out with somebody and the next day there would be something in the paper, and the poor fellow just wanted to the movies. you know, he was not proposing. and i am sure it probably hurt him with the other girls he was running around with. but we had the advantage of age and hopefully some judgment. now, the other side for the obama children is that they are young and they're very protected
organizations. it features the involvement of a professor from university of california san diego. it is working with local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understandings of neighborhoods , and personal security. there are a lot of approaches to changing perceptions and changing the securities sector. that is an addition to the high- level policy stuff that we discussed. >> thank you. you have anything -- ok. let's take this as our final question. i have one more, very last question to pose to our panel. >> good morning. i am an independent researcher and consultant on issues mainly around the police and conflict. my question is aimed primarily at a bob. i will tweet it for egypt and tunisia. a paper highlighted the problems and challenges in libya in conducting operations with a light footprint. it is not kosovo or iraq model where we had tens of thousands of people on the ground. my question and for bob is, what are our considerations with engagement or post-conflict ssr? what can we do during the conflict to set the stage for post-conflict to get on the ground, whether
. he adores this little boy who is growing up with multiple people who love him. california is about to pass a law making it legal for somebody to have three parents with all the different arrangements. if you have a step father who wants to adopt you had a biological father and mother, annie permutation of that, why can we not think about that? hillary clinton said it takes a village, and traditionally you have lots of family members. if you have more people in a child's live to love them, that is a good thing. >> thank you for that. now, let's get to the questions. please identify yourself if you would when you ask your question. i think we have somebody right here. >> i am the chief of staff to a member of congress. i have three children. i was a single parent for 16 years until two years ago when i got married. that was one thing i did not notice come up in the conversation. talk about marriage and families. i do agree there are lots of similarities in terms of the desire both men and women to parent and be there. i think one of the elements of our society is taking care of singl
manufacturing and california. it received some less money to go under. in massachusetts, it was evergreen solar that went bankrupt. to do you think that the government is trying to pick winners and losers in this field? >> i have heard that before. i do not believe in that idea. i believe in a comprehensive policy. the united states is not have that. for a number of things. the renewable energy is -- if you look at an evolutionary process, you always have billion at the start. two point to things life solyndra or the massachusetts failure, there is not a reason to quit. put together a comprehensive renewable energy policy. man sat so in the future we would not have so many failures. -- manage that so in the future we will not have so many failures. >> with that policy include subsidies for electric, batteries for cars? >> i will start to subsidize the renewable energy sector. for 100 years, we have been subsidizing also the o's. we are not close to running out of it. we will run out of them sooner or later. they are polluting. we need to take the money we have been giving a way and say we will
ford's funeral in california. we are a big family. >> have either view reached out out to the obama girls? have you speculated on what it is like to be first children at their age? >> no, because i have not been asked. they do not have to worry about dating. [laughter] even so, they are still pretty young. susan was in her prime. [laughter] i was also. late bloomer, but i was still in there. to some extent, i think some of the young man i would meet would want to talk to secret service and have nothing to do with me. you go out with someone at the next day there'd be something in the papers. the poor fellow disappointed to go to the movies. -- just wanted to go to the movies. we have the advantage of age and some judgment. for the obama children, they are young and very protected by their families. they're not quite out front. i hope they are making lots of friends at the schools they are going to. they seem to be doing it. everything i read, that is all i know. because of the senate connection, once a year the senate spouses have a lunch for the first lady. i had the opportunity to
of the second annual "the atlantic meets the pacific" conference at the university of california-san diego is 50 minutes. >> we're going to switch into a future oriented talk. i worked with jane for years at the institute for the future and she is a phenomenon. i could not be happier to get a chance to talk with her in front of you and everybody else in webland. notion developed. >> i started working with the institute for the future. united states. a lot of what we do is look at the technologies and figure out in the future. i had done live ph.d. at berkeley looking at gamers and do in real life. all the communities who would play their games and get all these great skills and look for a juicy problem in the real world that would let them use their skills. and there were none. what i started to do was look for ways you could create experiences that let people use their skills to solve problems. games are helping scientists have to cure cancer and they're working on climate change, everything you can imagine. >> i do not think people world is. when chris was saying 1 billion photos were applaude
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)